Ikea, cook this page campaign

Ikea, cook this page campaign

We all know Ikea for its modern design and simple to install furniture. But what if that simplicity would extend to something more, something more tasteful? The Ikea cook this page parchment paper recipe series is just that, a collection of easy-to-make recipes printed on cookable parchment paper.

In an attempt to promote its line of kitchenware products, Ikea in collaboration with Leo Burnett Canada has created a creative campaign that would make us amazing chefs. The cook this page parchment paper recipe series emulates the Ikea installing manuals.
With step-by-step instructions and a list of ingredients precisely illustrated on paper to match actual proportions, the only thing one had to do was add food, roll it all up and bake it. The recipes incorporate Ikea food items and also shines a light of the company’s kitchen product lines.

Ikea, cook this page campaign

Ikea, cook this page campaign

Ikea, cook this page campaign

Ikea, cook this page campaign

Ikea, cook this page campaign

On Leo Burnett Toronto’s website two creative directors, Anthony Chelvanathan and Steve Persico, shared their experience surrounding this campaign:

What inspired this idea?

IKEA is all about creating a better everyday life for people. Lately, the focus has been on the kitchen and everything that goes on inside that space. As part of a larger campaign, we were looking at all aspects of cooking and trying to make them better, easier and more creative. We realized trying new recipes is a little scary for people. We set out to make it better, easier and more creative by using creativity to reinvent the recipe. Plus, we love food and think about it all the time—so it was an idea that was close to our hearts.

This piece was one part of a larger campaign to make time in the kitchen more fun, easy and creative for people. It was an idea that existed in many forms: starting as dessert recipes printed on large peel-away posters, then evolving into recipes printed on different cooking materials, then eventually into the idea that was executed—fill-in-the-blank recipes printed on parchment paper. The more we worked on the idea, the better it got.

What was the hardest part about delivering on the idea?

In this case, thinking of the idea and getting the client on board was the easy part. The hard thing was execution. We needed a rare printing process, unique substrate (parchment) and food-safe ink. Our production team worked endlessly to find a supplier that could make it happen. It was an endless barrage of “No,” but eventually a “Yes” that then turned out to be an “Ooops, we can’t do that.” Persistence paid off, and we found someone who could make it happen. When you have a great idea and it seems like it just might not be possible, it’s frustrating and demotivating. But we found a way.

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Sergiu Naslau

I am a web and graphic designer, with a background in marketing, interested in visual communication and more. I created wabbaly.com to share my point of view on this visual world. You can keep up with me on Twitter, Facebook or .

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